From fault to gold

Sustainable art

Finding inspiration

Kintsukuroi

Kintsukuroi, or Kintsugi, is a Japanese art form that can be translated into English as ‘golden repair’. It is a method that repairs shattered pottery, by glueing it together with gold. The result is an exciting piece of pottery with golden grains weaving through it. A true work of art!

Inspiration

Life is just like this. Brokenness and hardship can form a source of inspiration and second flowering, and when looking back: a valuable teacher. I have experienced this myself during a great number of years of serious illness, and the recovery period that I am still in. These years have greatly contributed to who I am today. They have opened my eyes things that I used to overlook, little details in life, that give it that extra spark! I have had to abandon my perfectionism and became more connected with my feelings and intuition. These experiences, the suffering, and the battle I had to fight for every step of my recovery, are a great source of inspiration in my work. Like in Kintsukuroi, I do not believe in mistakes in art, but I let intuition be my guide and use the unexpected as a source of inspiration.

Again: sustainability

This way of working breaths sustainability, because I don’t throw away my artworks. When something unexpected happens, like a drop of ink that lands in the ‘wrong’ spot, I do not throw away to start over. No, I use the unexpected and work with the mistake. I tap into my imagination to find a new creativity, which opens the door to exciting adventures!

From fault to gold

Sustainable art

Finding inspiration

Kintsukuroi

Kintsukuroi, or Kintsugi, is a Japanese art form that can be translated into English as ‘golden repair’. It is a method that repairs shattered pottery, by glueing it together with gold. The result is an exciting piece of pottery with golden grains weaving through it. A true work of art!

Inspiration

Life is just like this. Brokenness and hardship can form a source of inspiration and second flowering, and when looking back: a valuable teacher. I have experienced this myself during a great number of years of serious illness, and the recovery period that I am still in. These years have greatly contributed to who I am today. They have opened my eyes things that I used to overlook, little details in life, that give it that extra spark! I have had to abandon my perfectionism and became more connected with my feelings and intuition. These experiences, the suffering, and the battle I had to fight for every step of my recovery, are a great source of inspiration in my work. Like in Kintsukuroi, I do not believe in mistakes in art, but I let intuition be my guide and use the unexpected as a source of inspiration.

Again: sustainability

This way of working breaths sustainability, because I don’t throw away my artworks. When something unexpected happens, like a drop of ink that lands in the ‘wrong’ spot, I do not throw away to start over. No, I use the unexpected and work with the mistake. I tap into my imagination to find a new creativity, which opens the door to exciting adventures!